Exercise can prevent the onset of Alzheimer’s disease, according to one study.

Growing evidence shows that physical activity and exercise can delay or prevent the onset of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In aging people, aerobic exercise increases gray and white matter volume, improves blood flow, and exercise can prevent the onset of Alzheimer’s disease, one study says (Unsplash). A recent study shows that a memory biomarker, myokin cathepsin B (CTSB), increased in older adults after 26 weeks of structured aerobic exercise. , published in the journal Frontiers in Endocrinology, showed that the positive association between CTSB and cognition and the substantial modulation of lipid metabolites involved in dementia increased the positive effects of exercise on brain function and health in those at risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

There is growing evidence that physical activity and exercise can delay or prevent the onset of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In aging people, aerobic exercise exercise increases gray and white matter volume, improves blood circulation, and improves memory function. The ability to measure and relate the effects of exercise on systemic biomarkers related to risk of AD. Major metabolic disorders can fuel prevention, monitoring, and treatment efforts. However, there is a lack of systemic biomarkers that can measure the effects of exercise on brain function and that have been linked to relevant metabolic reactions.

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